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Posts tagged “Guest

Ratchet and Clank Original Trilogy Retrospective Part 2

Ratchet & Clank 2: Locked and Loaded, (or Going Commando in parts of the world where innuendo can be in game titles), was released in 2003 on the PS2, one year after the first game. The game begins with the duo appearing on an interview, lamenting the fact that no one needs a hero nowadays.

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Thors-Kin Podcast Guest Spot

About a year or so after meeting Alex from Thors-Kin Podcast, inviting him to a GeekOut Shrewsbury Meet, even having him join us at a couple, and repeated invitations to join in the podcast and talk about GeekOut, who we are an what we do, I finally got time and opportunity together to join in with Alex and Tom to talk GeekOut, Shropshire Dungeon Master, and… other subjects. (more…)


Top 10 Action Anime

GeekOut Top 10s

Everybody was kung-fu fighting; sometimes strikin’ with lightnin’; in fact demons are a lil’ bit frightenin’, ah yeah, but they gunned them down with expert timin’! I should stick to writing articles…

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Roll On The Adventure Podcast

I was recently a guest in a podcast. It’s nice to be asked, and Roll On The Adventure piqued my interest.

In the podcast, the panel create, playtest, discuss, and publish a quick role playing system. It’s a great little quick-fire collaborative effort with bad singing and excellent

Dave is a figure of no small renown in the role-playing event circuit, Dimitris is a published designer and gamer, and Chris – in addition to being a prolific player – will be joining me to host a panel at Amecon this year. The first arc of the series created a game called Temporal Stereotype Zoo, a game about time travel, kidnap and/or abduction, and stereotypes throughout history.

The call for this series was for player-vs-player action, and Dimitris suggested going down the fantasy route to keep things classical, Dave suggested players taking control of an entire fa (more…)


The Force is my Ally – Why I Love Star Wars

It’s no secret that Geekout South-West is the domain of Trekkies, but I thought it would be cool to come in and bring balance to The Force. Yep, while the good lads here are Trek fans, I’m with the Republic, with Star Wars. Couple of weeks ago I dedicated five days to talking about some of the cooler stuff of the now unofficial Expanded Universe, the collection of media that well, expanded the Star Wars saga.

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Replacing the mighty Keeper – Part 1 of 3

When you were little did you ever get really upset if you were expecting something and it didn’t happen? I did. My level of expectation has been one of the harder things I have had to get a hold of in adult life and I’m not quite there yet but I know just how much better I am. I bet you’re wondering what has this got to do with GeekOut? Well I can remember one such situation about the breakup of the Bullfrog team as they were consumed by EA and then Dungeon Keeper 3 got shelved. Ever since then I have always wanted that game to happen and I know that whatever they may of made back in the day may not of lived up to my expectations.

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Video Game Highlight – Saboteur

Technology and the way games are published and made is very different today from how it was 30 years ago. You could say the same for any other industry, however the games industry I think has moved way faster than any other. Recently there has been a resurgence of games programmed by very small teams or a single developer with the re-birth of the indie scene. This may have something to do with the fact that computers are a much more consumable commodity and of course owe a little something to distribution services and easy ways to pay, like Steam. Thirty years ago these people were dubbed bedroom coders and I need you to imagine yourself back this far. Put yourself back in the year 1985 and in the mind of the then 18 year old, sole developer and self confessed college drop-out heralding from Taunton named Clive Townsend.

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A Tale Of Battle: How To Make Your RPG Combat Feel Epic

His hands trembled as he notched yet another arrow to his bow. Cowering behind a great rock column, he counted out his remaining flights in the dim light of the cave. Not enough. Behind him, the beast let out another gout of flame from its mighty jaws. The heat singed the hairs on the back of his neck, but the fiery breath was wild and untargeted, a burst of fury more than an attack.

He could see the bleeding, broken forms of his friends on the rocky ground. The once-proud warlock now lying shattered under a stalactite. The fighter, burnt by flames, groaning as he rocked in and out of consciousness. The gnome, buried under rock, struggling to breathe. The archer and the wizard, both trembling, frozen by the icy breath of one of the beast’s many heads. He was the last one left.

Of course, he could always run. There was nothing between him and the exit, nothing stopping him from beating a retreat. But then his dying friends would have no hope of survival. Worse than that, the beast would be able to escape into the settlement above. No. He had to stay and fight. He was the last line of defence, and he’d be damned if he left his post at a time like this.

His whole body shaking, sweat and tears mingling with the grit on his face, jolts of pain running through him from a dozen wounds, he spun around. And with those trembling hands he drew the bowstring back, stared into the eyes of the creature and with gritted teeth let loose his arrow…

What makes a combat encounter feel epic? Not just a fun game, not just a well-run session, but a truly awe-inspiring fight that you will end up remembering for years to come even though it happened with inch-high figures on a tabletop. It’s a question that all GMs should ask themselves at some point, as it’s the key to creating fantastic gaming sessions.

Pollice Verso *oil on canvas *97,4 x 146,6 cm *1872

I’ve been a GM for nearly nine years, and creating memorable combat encounters was one of the last skills I developed. I think a lot of other GMs probably feel the same way. I’ve seen (and run) so many combats that immediately degenerate into a meaningless slog as the party cut down enemy after enemy in a way that can feel more like a chore than a game.

It took me a little while to work out the key to making combat genuinely epic, and the solution didn’t come from D&D or Savage Worlds or any other roleplaying game. In fact, it came from my experience as a martial artist. While sparring and rolling dice are completely different in many ways, they are similar enough that a nerd like me can learn from them.
See, the first question you have to ask when tackling this question is: “What do my players want?” The answer will depend on the type of game you’re playing, but in general the answer is success. This comes in many forms throughout a game, but we’re only going to look at it regarding combat.

When fighting enemies, the way players experience success is pretty obvious. They succeed when the bad guys are dead, imprisoned, have run away or are otherwise defeated. So far, so simple. The problem is, after a while victory becomes a given. As your players defeat dozens of villains, it loses its impact.

050907-M-7747B-002 GINOWAN CITY, OKINAWA, Japan – Shinya Kinjo (left) and 1st Lt. Tim A. Martin (right) go down to the ground during a Judo session at the Ginowan City Police Station Sept. 7. Kinjo is a Ginowan City police officer and Martin is the officer in charge of the Crime Prevention Unit at Camp Foster’s Provost Marshal’s Office. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Scott M. Biscuiti)(released)

This occurred to me when I was talking to a friend about a recent martial arts session. I had been dumped on my head and mildly concussed by one of the bigger guys in the gym in practice. I realised that I only ever told stories about me getting hurt in some way.

I’ve told people about the time I got choked unconscious, the time I got face-locked so hard it tore an inch-long gash in my bottom lip, the time a guy bit me and the time all the capillaries in my eyes burst. Those are the memorable fights I’ve been in. I rarely ever talk about the sparring sessions I succeeded at, because those don’t make as good stories.

So why is that? I think it’s because there’s a common factor in each one of those sparring mishaps: I succeeded despite them. The guy that bit me? I arm-locked him until he stopped. When I got dumped on my head, I kept holding on to my opponent and ended up securing a choke. Sometimes it’s as simple as the fact that I came back onto the mats after getting knocked out.

Dungeons_&_Dragons_Miniatures_2

So, let’s get back to RPGs. How can all those little mishaps help your combat encounters? Well, I’ve started structuring mine in a similar way. If I have a session I want my players to remember, one with heightened drama and a feeling of epicness, I need to make sure they succeed despite the odds.

That’s really important. The best stories in the world are about heroes who overcome challenges they shouldn’t be able to get past. That’s basically the entire plot of Die Hard, and if you don’t think that’s one of the greatest stories ever told then you are a negative influence that I don’t need in my life.

I think this is where the stereotype of the GM who wants their party to die comes from. Well, actually I think it comes from bad GMs who want their party to die, but bear with me. Nobody competent actually wants their players to lose, but they want them to come close. Because when they’re inches away from total failure and succeed anyway, the feeling is fantastic.

So one key to epic combat is to ramp up the difficulty. You can do this in a number of ways. D&D is built around a kind of ‘war of attrition’ model, where difficulty comes from fighting lots of battles without the chance to rest and wearing the players down. Other games work better with single, more powerful boss monsters.

It’s worth being prepared to change the difficulty on the fly. If it looks like your party is going to tear through your boss without breaking a sweat, double its hit points. Or have it summon some other bad guys to help it. Alternatively, if the villain is knocking the stuffing out of the players then you’ll want to power them down a bit.

RPG-2009-Berlin-2

It’s not always easy to get the balance right. For the most epic struggles, you’ll want the entire party to get close to death, but you never want to lose more than one or two at most. Ideally, everyone will pull through. The only way to get better at this particular aspect is to play around with difficulty levels and keep experimenting.
But wait! There’s more. You see, great combats have another element to them besides the difficulty: a narrative. There should be a story to them, which is not the same as there being a story to the campaign.

For example, let’s say your plot has an evil warlord terrorising the land. Your party fights their way up to the castle and corners him on the roof. There’s your campaign plot – it’s why your players are there, fighting this particular person. But it’s not enough. There needs to be a separate narrative within the combat itself.

Let’s return to my martial arts experience. Remember the guy that bit me? There’s a story there: the opponent who wouldn’t play by the rules, but succumbed to courage and purity of heart. When I was dumped on my head but hung on anyway, that’s the classic narrative of brute force versus thoughtful technique.

I’m embellishing these of course – and making myself look like way more of a badass than I actually am – but you can see how there are themes to the fights themselves that are different from the plot. In an RPG, you have a lot of options to add a narrative to your combats.

In the example above with the warlord, you could have him destroy parts of the castle in a frenzied attempt to stop the players. He could try to run and have the players chase him down a secret passage full of traps. He could drink a Dr-Jekyll-esque potion and become a wild beast with the strength of ten men.

It’s not enough just to fight a villain if you really want the combat to be epic. I opened this article with a story from a recent session I ran, which I thought illustrated nicely how this works. In addition to the fact that the party was left with just one person standing (who succeeded in slaying the beast, by the way), there was also a good narrative running through it.

In this case it was that of the fearsome beast from beneath the ground trying to escape to wreak havoc on the surface. It’s a very simple story, but it transforms the combat from a simple fight into a last stand against a force of destruction.

There’s a lot more to creating truly memorable combats, and there is a lot you can learn about things like enemy types, use of scenery, open spaces vs choke points and other aspects of this part of GM-ing. But at it’s heart, the best fights are the ones you can tell stories about later. And the best stories are about overcoming the odds.


 

This article is a guest contribution by Joe Boyd. We’d like to extend our thanks to Joe for this brilliant article. The subject interested both of us GeekOut guys big time and when we read what he’d produced, we knew we wanted to share this with you all. Let us know what you think in the comments below, or over on Facebook and Twitter. If you’d like to get involved as a guest blogger, why not contact us?


GeekOut Podcast #2 – GET A GRIP OF YOURSELF, MAN!

In this weeks’ GeekOut Podcast, we discuss rules within games and genres. As is seemingly becoming the norm for us, we managed to go so far off subject, we ended up in the realms of achievements and more.

GeekOut Podcast

We’re hoping to keep the podcasts to a consistent biweekly basis from here on in, so the next episode of the GeekOut Podcast should hopefully be on Sunday 11th October! If we can manage more, we’ll do more too! We’re also going to move our audio away from Soundcloud, as we cannot afford the hosting plans. We’re likely going to create some spiffy graphics and upload all of our audio to YouTube, but if you have any better ideas for hosting podcasts, please let us know!

Podcasts aren’t all we’re doing now. Did you know that Timlah has finally gone ahead and recorded his first ever Lets Play episode? He’s playing the Dungeon Crawling classic, Stonekeep, a classic game that both of the GeekOut guys are hugely fond of. It’ll go live on Wednesday along with a post, so keep your eyes peeled for that and let him know how good (or bad) he is!

Over to you: What genres do you know that have strict rules and what genres could you not play if they didn’t adhere to their rules? Hey, do you want to get involved with the GeekOut Podcast and just chat nonsense with Joel and Timlah? Let us know in the comments below, over on Facebook and Twitter, or shoot us an email.


Tip of The Hats, TF2 Charity Event

Video games and charity; two things that have gone together hand-in-hand over the past few years, and for good reason. The gaming community has, time and time again, proven to be one of the most effective, most ambitious and most generous when it comes to fund-raising and this is perfectly exemplified by Tip of the Hats, an annual 48-hour stream event run by the Team Fortress 2 community, bringing the best names and personalities of both the casual and competitive scenes together under one banner and one cause: to raise as much money as possible for One Step Camp. If you’ve heard of it, you understand the hype. If you haven’t, dear reader, you’re in luck; this year’s event is coming up very soon indeed, on the weekend of the 19th-20th of September.

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