The Road To 100%: AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome

This year, I seemingly have gotten a bit more serious about my 100% ventures in game. I got so serious, I managed to get 100% of achievements on Skyrim. When I finished Skyrim, I knew I had to get a new game and I wanted to go for a way different genre. I thought about games I say I really like, but hadn’t really committed the time required to get really good at. Then, my mind went back to Owlchemy and Dejobaan Games’ AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome, a title about freefalling from floating buildings whilst flipping off or thanking fans… And tagging buildings.

This year, I seemingly have gotten a bit more serious about my 100% ventures in game. I got so serious, I managed to get 100% of achievements on Skyrim. When I finished Skyrim, I knew I had to get a new game and I wanted to go for a way different genre. I thought about games I say I really like, but hadn’t really committed the time required to get really good at. Then, my mind went back to Owlchemy and Dejobaan Games’ AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome, a title about freefalling from floating buildings whilst flipping off or thanking fans… And tagging buildings.

There truly is a game for every niche…

Continue reading “The Road To 100%: AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome”

On Greenlight: Cool Egg on the Run – Bristol-Based Devs

Want to help support local devs do their thing? Great! We’ve got a little task for all of you GeekOut South-West fans out there – Give this game a like over on Steam Greenlight and help it go live. Ah but hold on, I’ve not given you any information about the game yet, have I? Fear not, I’ve played it and here’s a full review of the upcoming action platformer from the University of the West of England, Cool Egg on the Run.

Continue reading “On Greenlight: Cool Egg on the Run – Bristol-Based Devs”

Multiplayer Gaming

Multiplayer games are a staple in the video game industry, as a way to interact with others through the medium… Or just to show someone how l33t you are. However in recent years, a lot of multiplayer games have changed how they are played. No longer are we playing games of healthy competition, but more games are out there to show that you’re better for having played them longer than someone else. Join me as I take a look back through multiplayer games of old and how modern games tackle the communication between people.

Multiplayer games are a staple in the video game industry, as a way to interact with others through the medium… Or just to show someone how l33t you are. However in recent years, a lot of multiplayer games have changed how they are played. No longer are we playing games of healthy competition, but more games are out there to show that you’re better for having played them longer than someone else. Join me as I take a look back through multiplayer games of old and how modern games tackle the communication between people.

Pong

We’ll begin by taking a trip down memory lane, or for many of us, a year before we were even conceived. In the early 1970s, the first ever Pong consoles were released to the general public and people were buying them by the boat load. Well okay, perhaps not quite a boat load of them, but people all over were willing to get their hands on a way to interact with their television sets in more than a typical watch the broadcast way. They wanted to play Pong, a game that was only available in the arcades prior, in their home with their own friends without having to take change to play on the machines.

Whilst Pong was all well and good, it was just the first in a long line of easy games to pick up and play. We started to get games like Dig-Dug, Pac-Man, even games like Tetris supported more than one player after a while, for a little bit of competitive gaming between friends and family. But by the time the SNES was out, most of these simple two player games started to dwindle in favour for more complex, trickier to play single player games. Sure action games and fighting games were still popular enough to have two player modes, but games were already making their way into RPGs and more.

Spyro was one of the many PS1 games that was incredibly popular but minus multiplayer functionality.
Spyro was one of many PS1 games that was incredibly popular but had no multiplayer functionality.

Now this isn’t to say that multiplayer games disappeared, but they had to evolve and adapt. Over time, we went on to playing less random action/adventure games, less platformers and more into shooters. These games were more like Quake and Unreal. Around the same sort of time, the PS1 came out and even more single player games came out. Games along the lines of Crash Bandicoot and Spyro. In the case of Crash, this was a platformer that did away with multiplayer all together, in favour of a more in depth story in the game. It’s not a traditional platformer, but it still is one. Hey, at the end of the PS1 years, my favourite RPG of all time came out: Final Fantasy IX. No main Final Fantasy game had done multiplayer at this point.

So shooters were the thing that really kept multiplayer going for a period of time, but then around the 2000s, the long standing MMORPG World of Warcraft came out. It’s incredible to think that next year the WoW community will have the Burning Legion to defeat in World of Warcraft. MMORPGs weren’t new… I was very accustomed to playing games such as Dark Ages of Camelot and City of Heroes at this point… But now the RPG genre was being more innovative and more involving of multiplayer, but really, this was a different way to play: This was about working together to defeat huge enemies, or fighting one another in intense battles. These are games of numbers, the more numbers you have, the better you do is the general rule of thumb.

Source: OUYA.tv
Source: OUYA.tv

Now we’ve got the indie scene, a thriving community with countless fun games to play. Since I got my OUYA last year, I have played many cool multiplayer games, such as Amazing Frog? and Hidden In Plain Sight (which is also on Steam). These games have brought back the sense of fun, the sense of pure silly gameplay along with a little bit of competitive nature and in some cases: skill of the game. But whilst multiplayer games never left us, it sure feels now that we’ve got a more diverse library of games out there. Now there are games for those who want to invest plenty of time, as well as games which you just put on at a party. What’s your earliest memory of a multiplayer game? Share your favourite multiplayer games in the comments below, or over on Facebook and Twitter.

P.S: If you are ever in doubt about a good multiplayer game to get into, consider getting a fighting game or a shooter. Those generally are multiplayer. If you want something a bit different, for fighting check out Guilty Gear, for the characters are so outlandish, you end up falling for each and every one of them. I personally like using Bridget and Faust as my guys. For FPS, I implore you to play the Unreal Tournament games. Those are my personal picks for franchises!

Sublevel Zero – Super procedural space adventures with so much freedom!

Sublevel Zero is looking like a superbly executed space adventure, so if you’ve not got enough spaceships in your life – come check out this post so you know where to get your next fix!

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Sublevel Zero is a fantastic looking upcoming 6 Degrees of Freedom shooter which is following in the footsteps of some of the great indie games we’ve seen over the past few years. With procedurally generated levels and Oculus Rift support, looting and crafting systems in place, this game has really set itself apart from its current competition. It’s a roguelike game too, meaning once you’re dead, you are back to square one.

The joy of games like Sublevel Zero is its replay value. In a permadeath game, where the levels are never the same, you can come back to this game time in and time out with no issues of seeing the same old things.

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The game is in first-person, so as you can imagine on an Oculus Rift, this game is quite intense. The ability to look around in Oculus Rift is honestly amazing, especially with the stylised low-poly graphics. For a game of this kind, whilst you could have something all realistic (and believe me, that will be cool to see), I like this game being the way it is. It’s beautiful in an oddly digital way.

Oh, but you’re like me. You’re running Linux or Mac and we’re teasing you with all of these fantastic games. Stop right there! Sublevel Zero is being made for Steam and it’ll be available for PC, Mac AND Linux. It’ll be Oculus Rift compatible and is being distributed by Mastertronic. We can expect to see this awesome title over on Steam in summer this year.

This game grabbed my attention whilst I was at Rezzed, so much so that I made sure to grab the attention of the developers for a quick chat about their title! Don’t forget to go and check out the developers at their website Sigtrap Games, or drop them an e-mail. You can also get a hold of them over at Twitter (@SigtrapGames).

Sublevel Zero is looking like a superbly executed space adventure, so if you’ve not got enough spaceships in your life – You know where to get your next fix!

What do you think of Sublevel Zero? What was the last 6 Degrees of Freedom game you played? As always, leave your comments below, over on Facebook or Twitter and let us know what you think!

Rezzed 2015 Gallery

This is a no-nonsense, no chat needed post, showing off the venue, the people, the sights and the merch of Rezzed 2015. If you see yourself in any of these posts, or just want to comment on anything you see, as always put your comments in the section below. Alternatively, chat with us on Facebook or Twitter!

This is a no-nonsense, no chat needed post, showing off the venue, the people, the sights and the merch of Rezzed 2015. If you see yourself in any of these posts, or just want to comment on anything you see, as always put your comments in the section below. Alternatively, chat with us on Facebook or Twitter!

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Beating a game (properly!)

As you sit down at your computer, or your console, you stare at your list or your collection of games and have to consider to yourself: Which game is worth my time right now? What game do I want to play?

For me, I’m an avid fan of the current surge of indie games that have been coming out since about 2010, hence I am so excited for what I’m attending in just a few weeks. With this said however, sometimes you don’t just want to beat the game; you want to beat it properly! This is what I’ve been working on in some of my spare time recently, properly beating a game that I’m quite a fan of. What do I mean by properly, though? Of course I mean beating it for everything it ever had within it!

As you sit down at your computer, or your console, you stare at your list or your collection of games and have to consider to yourself: Which game is worth my time right now? What game do I want to play?

For me, I’m an avid fan of the current surge of indie games that have been coming out since about 2010, hence I am so excited for what I’m attending in just a few weeks. With this said however, sometimes you don’t just want to beat the game; you want to beat it properly! This is what I’ve been working on in some of my spare time recently, properly beating a game that I’m quite a fan of. What do I mean by properly, though? Of course I mean beating it for everything it ever had within it!

Continue reading “Beating a game (properly!)”

Humble Indie Bundle 11

I am a big fan of these indie games but not because it’s the cool thing to do now. I’ve been playing indie games since before it was cool (I’m being such a hipster just for this post.)

The Humble Indie Bundle 11 contains some awesome titles and you can get all of them if you pay equal or more than the average price of $4.61.

Here’s the list of the titles you can get with this latest indie bundle:

Less than average price

  1. Guacamelee! Gold Edition
  2. Dust: An Elysian Tail
  3. Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams
  4. The Swapper

Equal or more than average price

  1. Antichamber
  2. Monaco: What’s Yours Is Mine
  3. FEZ
  4. Starseed Pilgrim
  5. Beat Buddy

As a side note, they give you Steam codes which you can redeem on the Steam platform. All of these games work on Windows, Mac and Linux and are all worth looking at. Consider this: The money you give to this cause can go entirely to the developers, entirely to the people who make the bundle, entirely to charity, or a mix of the three to your choosing. Trust me, anyone who purchases, even for the small amounts, to buy these great games are doing something great. They are helping people all across the world, or some starving developers.

There’s only 6 and a half days left since I posted this, so if I were you, if you were considering this bundle, get it ASAP before the time has run out!

Yes, it’s cheap for so many games… And this is how you can fill that Steam library with some great, unique titles.

There’ll, eventually, be reviews for these games on this site. I was planning on doing a FEZ play-through anyway!

Please support the bundles here.