Those Bad Creative Habits

While Tim brings a close to his NaNoWriMo efforts (well done man), and as the year heralds the end of GeekOut, I’m coming to realise that a few of my bad habits have reared their ugly heads. Perhaps it’s brought about by the sedentary lifestyle of a self-employed writer and entertainer, destined to only travel for work once or twice a week for the foreseeable future. I’m stuck in front of my computer far more often, clawing and reaching for excuses to get out of the house for a few hours. Fortunately running GeekOut events have afforded me a far wider social circle, so I’m certainly not short of people whose times I can encroach upon. But in between coffees and gigs, I sit, a slave to my keyboard and microphone.

I recently used Skyrim as a means of pulling myself out of an unpleasant mental spiral. It worked, and I’ve built up a rather brutal sneaky barbarian and necromancer who I’m rather pleased with. Built a house at staggering speed, took part in the civil war for the first time ever (disappointing cycle of quick mission and dull fort sieges to be honest), and then realised how much time I’d been pouring into the game… and all of the games I’d neglected.

Understand that I am not saying Skyrim was a bad choice, nor am I particularly saying that the amount of time I’ve been spending playing games has been particularly negative, but there is a definite need to dig into the untapped well of unplayed games, and not give in to the temptations of the Autumn sale! That well is not running dry any time soon.

And it’s not just Skyrim, I’ve been watching the same cycle of YouTube videos, watching the same old films and TV shows that make me a little over-comfortable, and while they do just that, I come to face a blank page and find myself with nothing new to say. I sit and drive at old projects, progress definitely slowed, but I’m definitely not going to give into the temptation of starting a new project and consigning the current ones to the archive of half-finished trash.

To be fair I’m rather proud of some of that trash, pieces of it are constantly being rolled into the next thing, and onwards to the next thing, so that my entire library of unfinished products can be charted like sedimentary strata, but it doesn’t change the fact that there’s very little finished work in it. It’s a terrible cycle, but there’s some positive side-effects.

We’re creatures of habit, life is a series of cycles, good and bad. Hells, I’m almost entirely certain I’ve written this article before, perhaps not with the same words or the same examples, just something to consciously break the loop and to drive me back into doing something positive with my work, and maybe to encourage others too, to recognise what are positive habits and what are destructive cycles, how to promote some and break others.

Sometimes one requires a kick up the idiom, and as perverse as it sounds, I tend to use the same YouTube videos every time I need one, because it’s advice I need to hear, and sometimes need to be reminded of.

Next on the to-do list, play a different game, prepare for Christmas, and the start of a new chapter, get some new working routines, and try and get back into the habits that GeekOut has fostered in me for the last six years.

Live for the positive takeaway.

Top 10 – Effigies

I have travelled far and wide to find the object, the one object that will destroy my arch-nemesis. But I really never imagined the effigy that I must destroy would be… A plushie? Well, effigies come in all shapes and sizes, along with varying degrees of strangeness. Nevertheless today we’re going to look at our Top 10 Effigies that are in film, TV, video games, anime and more. Continue reading “Top 10 – Effigies”

Inventory Hoarding

My name is Joel Smith, I am a hoarder.

I suppose the worst of it has been my need to build new houses to store my stuff, and to have somewhere nearby where I can drop things off. In my line of work I find myself encountering a lot of valuables, and they’re just there for me to walk away with, it’s a kind of salvage operation in dangerous areas, so I’m ultimately restoring a lot of valuable items to the general public, and I will sell them on, but I guess there’s only so much people can buy from me at any given time, so I end up sitting on a small stockpile of… I dunno, ebony hammers? Spells scrolls? Piles of dragon bones? Continue reading “Inventory Hoarding”

Top 10 Shields

The enemies are approaching; They’re charging at great haste. Their swords are drawn and their casters are primed and ready. The archers have their arrows drawn – We’re surrounded. Send the soldiers to the front of the lines, we need to show them the best offense is a great defence – We’re going to put our shields up this week, as we check out our Top 10 Shields – We could do with the protection!

GeekOut Top 10s

The enemies are approaching; They’re charging at great haste. Their swords are drawn and their casters are primed and ready. The archers have their arrows drawn – We’re surrounded. Send the soldiers to the front of the lines, we need to show them the best offense is a great defence – We’re going to put our shields up this week, as we check out our Top 10 Shields – We could do with the protection!

Continue reading “Top 10 Shields”

Skyrim: Dragonborn – Improving An Already Great Game

Some of my Steam friends would have noticed I was playing Skyrim again recently, where I set out to do as much of the game as I could. I just wanted a change of pace, so it was great picking Skyrim back up. But one thing I had never done in the now-classic RPG is play the DLC, Dragonborn, Hearthfire or Dawnguard. I decided to have a go at the DLC and boy, was I ever in for a treat? How had I not played these before? More importantly, why hadn’t I played Dragonborn before?!

Some of my Steam friends would have noticed I was playing Skyrim again recently, where I set out to do as much of the game as I could. I just wanted a change of pace, so it was great picking Skyrim back up. But one thing I had never done in the now-classic RPG is play the DLC, Dragonborn, Hearthfire or Dawnguard. I decided to have a go at the DLC and boy, was I ever in for a treat? How had I not played these before? More importantly, why hadn’t I played Dragonborn before?!

Continue reading “Skyrim: Dragonborn – Improving An Already Great Game”

Top 10 – World Destroying Monsters

GeekOut Top 10s

Cosmic destroyers, world eaters and Earth shatterers – Oh my! A good world destroying monster doesn’t need to be above mortality, but it certainly helps! An antagonist who offers grave consequences for those who don’t manage to defeat them, the world destroying monsters of fantasy, sci-fi and legend are always amongst the toughest enemies. Ignoring just how tough these bad guys are, it’s time to check out our Top 10 World Destroying Monsters. Continue reading “Top 10 – World Destroying Monsters”

Top 10 Role Playing Games

Grand stories, lush landscapes and gripping character development – These are the three real key components for a successful Role Playing Game, of which all of our choices this week have in abundance. It’s time to equip the best gear, check our stats and see if we will get that legendary drop we’ve been grinding for hours for – So stick around and check out Timlah and Joel’s Top 10 Role Playing Games!

GeekOut Top 10s

Grand stories, lush landscapes and gripping character development – These are the three real key components for a successful Role Playing Game, of which all of our choices this week have in abundance. It’s time to equip the best gear, check our stats and see if we will get that legendary drop we’ve been grinding for hours for – So stick around and check out Timlah and Joel’s Top 10 Role Playing Games!

Continue reading “Top 10 Role Playing Games”

Re-Skinning D&D Creatures, Part 2

Last week I took a handful of classic D&D creatures and proposed new uses for their stat-blocks, something to lend a bit of diversity to the current roster with minimal need to create, change or modify. If your campaign has a flavour that the Monster Manual simply doesn’t cater for, there are ways and means of accommodating to your tastes. This week I’ll approach from the other side of the coin, declaring what I need for my campaign and using the tools at hand to make a solution.

Once again I’ll be using D&D 5th edition because it’s what I know best… Continue reading “Re-Skinning D&D Creatures, Part 2”

In Defence of Railroading

Since the dominance of the sandbox, railroading gameplay through linear non-divergent story and specific plot paths has become something of a faux-pas in game design, and was never looked upon favourably in tabletop roleplaying. As a player you seek agency, and often that comes from such simple things as choosing which path to take to the same inevitable end, and not following the obvious trail of breadcrumbs laid out for you. These days we laud games for open worlds, multiple endings, and the ability to approach one problem a dozen ways, to play it your way.

All but gone are the days of the 3D platformer, and the rail shooter, technology and computing power has given us the power to create actual worlds and weave beautiful stories into them rather than just telling a story and dragging you by the nose along it.

But is it so bad a thing that we’re better off entirely being rid of it, and casting away the strictly linear narratives of old?

There are times when actually taking your players by the nose and dragging them to the plot is not necessarily an unforgivable act. Here are a couple of examples of uses for, and in defence of railroading your story.

The Beginning

Here’s a nice easy one to get this started off. When beginning a campaign, or game, or whatever interactive experience your trying to share, you’ll usually have a few fundamentals to share, basic bits of information to share that’ll allow the player to understand the experiences to follow. A little bit of railroading aids “showing not telling” like the opening test chambers of Portal encouraging thinking with portals. Obduction drives you down a path in pursuit of one of the world-shifting seeds, and leaves you in a small bubble that tells you everything you need to know about the transition mechanics you’ll be playing with.

It’s a form of tutorial, but done right it’s so subtle that you barely notice it every replay. We’re guided through set pieces that leave us without doubt about where we’re going or what we’re doing for the rest of the game.

A Bottleneck

There are occasions where your story takes a turn that irrevocably changes everything. No turning back, and no matter what you have done up to this point this moment was unavoidable. Moments like the time-shift in Guild Wars, where the entire “tutorial” felt like an open world in it’s own right, only for everything to change in a single moment. Transitioning from one Mass Effect or Witcher still leaves you with a short period in which games are identical, no matter the decisions you’ve made.

Now, actions and decisions made before this pivotal moment can alter the events that follow, but all paths lead here ultimately. Most games use this kind of narrative, the storyline quests that so often get ignored in pure sandboxes, but there are times where that epic moment changes everything to the point where there’s no going back or wandering off to finish that sidequest you’ve been ignoring.

False Choices

I’ll skim over this because this one’s more of a cheap trick, somewhat less acceptable. False choices are the doors you walk up to that suddenly slam shut and lock you out, or those decisions that immediately kill you or end the game. Arkham City did that with Catwoman’s story at one stage, where she had the option to simply walk away with loot in pocket, but because the game needed you to save Batman the game simply ended there. Sorry guys, given a real choice I’d have taken the money and run.

A Good Story

Halflife, Telltale Games, Psychonauts, hell most games will railroad up to a point. When your story is good and worth telling there’s nothing wrong with taking agency from the players in terms of narrative direction. In the drive to create bigger and more incredible games let’s not lose sight of a good story and the ways in which we can tell them, putting the player into the hazard suit of a mute scientist as he weaves through supersoldiers and alien parasites to reach the incredible conclusion of his epic tale (that will have been stuck on a cliffhanger for ten years this October) or filling the boots of the intrepid archaeologist as she shoots her way through adventures far more thrilling than any actual archaeologist would ever encounter.

I consider myself a world-builder first and foremost, so I’ll advocate for the ability to wander aimlessly around the whole world and delve its deepest corners and unveil every shred of lore, even if I have to sit and spend time that should be shooting down killer robots reading books on killer robot maintenance. But sometimes when a moment needs to be shared, or an idea is so stunning that it simply must be seen, there’s nothing wrong with putting the plot on tracks and asking everyone to enjoy the ride for a while.

Top 10 – Finishing Moves

The fight is fought and won, there is no more glory to be had here, so why are you lingering? Why it’s to finish the job in style of course; because no epic fight is finished with one guy just bleeding from his wounds, or simply limping away to feel sorry for himself. You have to let them know who’s won, you have to do it in style!

GeekOut Top 10s

The fight is fought and won, there is no more glory to be had here, so why are you lingering? Why it’s to finish the job in style of course; because no epic fight is finished with one guy just bleeding from his wounds, or simply limping away to feel sorry for himself. You have to let them know who’s won, you have to do it in style!

Continue reading “Top 10 – Finishing Moves”